20 May 2020 last updated at 21:04 GMT
 
Lee sympathises with team India
Saturday 27 August 2011

The Indian cricket team has attracted a lot of criticism from many quarters after their disastrous performance in the Test series against England. But they’ve found a backer from an unlikely source.

Australian fast bowler Brett Lee sympathised with Mahendra Singh Dhoni's men by saying he knew how difficult the conditions can be in "Old Blighty".

"The loss is going to hurt India. But they are very difficult conditions to play with the ball seaming and swinging around, which we found out in the 2005 Ashes series. I am not surprised they (England) are playing very well," he said.

Lee was referring to the 1-2 defeat suffered by the then high-flying team led by Ricky Ponting against the Michael Vaughan-led England after the Aussies had gone 1-0 up by winning the series opener at Lord's.

"England played really well and you would point your fingers at India when they lose 4-0 and India hasn't played the best cricket. But look at the other side of the fence as well and think maybe England has played some very, very good cricket. But I think they (India) will bounce back," he added.

India is currently grappling with injuries with two of its frontline pacers - Zaheer Khan and Ishant Sharma - out of the team and Lee, who himself had to struggle through out his career against injuries, said fast bowling remained the toughest job in cricket and it was up to the individuals to maintain fitness.

"Fast bowling is the toughest job in cricket. You have to work hard to stay strong and fit. You need to know your body. You need to love it (fast bowling) too. Enjoyment is the most important thing in life. If you do believe in something, then you are going to get a lot better out of it and have fun along the way," said the blond pacer.

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